Monthly Archives October 2007

Quartz crystal cluster properties

The quartz crystal cluster formation is amongst the chief formations that are recognized by the preponderance of crystals in a cluster, appearing as a group type of formation in caves, veins, or geodes. Quartz clusters are formed from multiple crystals joined together at a common base and the sizes of these clusters can range from tiny, to massively huge. Besides quartz, other minerals can also form clusters. An example is selenite. The quartz crystal cluster combines the group energy of the entire number of crystals in the cluster, and due to this, it is often used as a charger for
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Possible side effects of using crystals

Crystal energy is real, and for some people, they may experience some side effects after being in contact with them, or when working with their energies. In the mineralogical kingdom, quartz crystals (SiO2) are considered to be amongst the strongest conductors of metaphysical energy. Certain side effects could be experienced with crystals, most noticeably with quartz crystals. You should become familiar with, and prepared for any possible side effects of working with crystals, whether on others, or on yourself. Some possible side effects that are mainly associated with quartz crystals are: Diarrhea Sometimes, overexposure to crystals may result in an
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Tiger’s eye properties

Tiger’s eye (also called Tiger eye) is a type of quartz replacement of the mineral crocidolite which is a form of asbestos, called blue asbestos. It is formed when the crocidolite has dissolved away over time, and replaced with silica (quartz). These days, you may have already noticed some people wearing tiger eye jewelry; tiger eye is rapidly gaining popularity as a trendy piece of jewelry, fashioned into pendents or bracelets. Tiger’s eye exhibits chatoyancy, meaning a kind of reflection depending on the angle of the light shining upon the its fibrous structure. This property is also shared most notably
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The unique appeal of turquoise

Turquoise is a type of combination of phosphates of copper and aluminum in hydrous structure, and the entire chemical or rather, mineral formula is quite long and complex with CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8·4H2O as the scientifically given formula. At a glance, this means turquoise isn’t very hard on the Mohs scale, because long complex combinations of hydrates denote a certain fragility. Thus, turquoise has only a hardness of 5-6 on the Mohs scale, with the varying hardness dependent on the density of minute crystalline structures within it.
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